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On Tuesday, a strawberry supermoon will rise. Here’s how you can view it.

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Amateur astronomers take note: On Tuesday night, the Supermoon will appear uncommonly full and brilliant, yet you won’t need a high-tech telescope or pricey binoculars to appreciate it.

The strawberry moon is a term given to the full moon in June by the Algonquin Native American tribe in the northeastern United States and eastern Canada, and it relates to the region’s strawberry picking season (not the moon’s actual colour).
In June, it will be at its closest point in its orbit to Earth, making it a supermoon by conventional criteria.

“Any full Moon that is at a distance of at least 90% of perigee (which is the point at which the Moon is closest to Earth) is considered a supermoon,”

This is explained in the Old Farmer’s Almanac. “The full Moon in June is 222,238.4 miles (357,658 kilometres) distant, well within that cut-off point.”
When a supermoon is at its furthest point in its orbit from Earth, NASA estimates it appears 17 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than the weakest moon of the year. Supermoons are uncommon, occurring just three to four times a year and always in a row.

From Sunday evening until Wednesday morning, this one looks to be filled. Before you watch, here’s everything you should know.
Depending on where you reside, there is an ideal viewing time.

The June supermoon will technically occur — that is, it will be totally lighted by the sun — at 7:51 a.m. ET on Tuesday, though it will seem full the day before and after.

This is explained in the Old Farmer’s Almanac. “The full Moon in June is 222,238.4 miles (357,658 kilometres) distant, well within that cut-off point.”
When a supermoon is at its furthest point in its orbit from Earth, NASA estimates it appears 17 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter than the weakest moon of the year. Supermoons are uncommon, occurring just three to four times a year and always in a row.

From Sunday evening until Wednesday morning, this one looks to be filled. Before you watch, here’s everything you should know.
Depending on where you reside, there is an ideal viewing time.

The June supermoon will technically occur — that is, it will be totally lighted by the sun — at 7:51 a.m. ET on Tuesday, though it will seem full the day before and after.

It’s visible with the naked eye, but binoculars or a livestream are other options.
According to NASA, this week’s full moon will be the lowest of the year, rising only 23.3 degrees above the southern horizon.

You should be able to see it without any equipment as long as the skies are clear and nothing is blocking your view.
According to Space.com, “full moons are a fascinating time to view lunar characteristics because the rest of the sky will be washed out by the brightness.” “Depending on the culture you follow, you can view the enormous highlands and lowlands of the moon with your naked eye, which can look to be various forms and develop legends about those shapes.”

You’ll be able to view craters, mountains, and other aspects of the moon’s surface if you have binoculars or a telescope. “You can’t miss it in the sky,” it says, “and it’s a pretty large object to practise automatic tracking.” Full moons, it adds, are suitable targets for novices because “you can’t miss it in the sky.”
A free livestream from the Virtual Telescope Project in Ceccano, Italy, will show the full moon rising above Rome starting at 3:15 p.m. ET.

Don’t worry if you don’t get a good view this week; there are more supermoons on the way.

Tuesday’s moon is the second of four consecutive supermoons that will be seen this summer in the Northern Hemisphere, depending on whose definition you choose.

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